LG GX OLED TV Review

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With a special ‘Gallery’ style, the LG GX is a new TV in LG’s 2020 lineup. Instead of a frame, it’s a really thin TV that comes with a wall mount, and it’s supposed to sit flush against the wall. The image quality is outstanding; it will dim pixels individually, like any OLED, resulting in an infinite contrast ratio and absolute black uniformity. For HDR content, it shows a huge color reproduction, but it has an extreme Automatic Brightness Limiter, so large areas aren’t bright.

It has support for variable refresh rate (VRR), a near-instant response time, a Black Frame Insertion mode, and gaming’s low input lag. Unfortunately, it has the possibility of permanent burn-in, like any OLED, which can be a problem if you watch content with repetitive elements all the time, like the television, but if you watch diverse content, it shouldn’t pose too much of a problem. Finally, it has wide viewing angles, which is ideal for wide configurations for seating.

PROS

  • Nearly infinite contrast ratio.
  • Wide viewing angles.
  • Near-instant response time.
  • VRR support.

CONS

  • Aggressive Automatic Brightness Limiter (ABL).
  • Risk of permanent burn-in.

Design:

 

The LG GX features an impressive interface. It is very thin and the whole Display has a uniform thickness. Where the front and back panels meet, there are tapered edges that allow the TV to sit flat against the wall when mounted on the wall, making it appear like a picture frame. It comes with LG’s Flush Wall Mount, and if you don’t want to wall-mount it, you can buy the feet separately.

LG sells feet you can buy separately for this stand, which is what we did, and they hold the TV well. If you don’t plan on wall-mounting it, then consider the LG CX OLED, which is a very similar TV that’s cheaper and it comes with a stand.

Footprint of the 55″ stand: 45.4″ x 10.7″.

Incredible build quality. With a special style, the LG GX is extremely well-crafted. The back is mostly built of metal that does not bend much and there are no noticeable problems with the build quality.

Picture Quality:

The LG GX has an infinite contrast ratio, like all OLED TVs, because it can turn individual pixels off, resulting in flawless blacks.

Since this TV doesn’t have a backlight, it doesn’t have a local dimming feature. It can dim pixels individually, so bright objects and subtitles are displayed perfectly, with no visible blooming.

Movies: The LG GX OLED is an amazing TV for movie watching. It has a virtually infinite contrast ratio and complete uniformity in black, so movies look fantastic in a dark space. It well upscales lower-resolution video and excludes every source from 24p judder. Unfortunately, because this TV has a near-instant response time, the content of the lower frame rate can tend to stutter.

TV Shows: Excellent for TV shows. The LG GX has really large viewing angles, perfect if you walk around your favorite show while enjoying it. It has exceptional handling of reflection, but may not be clear enough in well-lit settings to fight glare. Without any problems, it upscales lower-resolution video, including from cable boxes. Unfortunately, if you continuously watch content with static features, including the television, it has the possibility of permanent burn-in, which could be a problem.

Sports: For watching games, the LG GX is excellent. It has a near-instant reaction time, resulting in limited motion blur, and if you want to watch the game with a big group of buddies, it has multiple viewing angles. In bright rooms, it does well because it has excellent reflection control, but it doesn’t get light enough to fight a lot of glare. Our device has a uniform screen without the effect of a dirty screen, although this can vary between units. TV for Sports

HDR Movies: Excellent for movies from HDR. The LG GX has an infinite contrast ratio and has absolute black uniformity, showing incredibly deep blacks. For HDR, it shows a wide colour gamut, but in HDR it does not get vivid enough to really pull out highlights. Due to its near-instant response time, the lower frame rate content can begin to stutter. It can delete the 24p judder from any source.

HDR Gaming: Best TV for HDR play, the LG GX is excellent. It is filled with gaming features such as support for VRR, almost immediate response time, and low lag input. HDR content looks nice when it shows a wide variety of colors, but to really make highlights stand out, it does not get very bright in that mode. It shows perfect blacks, ideal for dark-room gaming thanks to this TV’s almost infinite contrast ratio.

PC Monitor: An excellent alternative to use as a PC display is the LG GX. It has wide viewing angles, low lag entry, and near-instant response time. It also shows a 4:4:4 chroma, which is critical for text reading. Unfortunately, it has the possibility of permanent burn-in, because static components from the GUI of a device will damage the screen over time, but if you display varied content, this should not be a problem. Best TV for PC Monitor

Video Games: Outstanding TV for video games. The LG GX has a 120Hz refresh rate and VRR support to reduce screen tearing. Its response time is near-instant and it has a Black Frame Insertion feature. Input lag is also incredibly low. Also, it’s amazing for dark-room gaming because of its nearly infinite contrast ratio. Sadly, it has the risk of permanent burn-in if you constantly play video games with an interface that has a lot of static elements, but we don’t expect this to be an issue for most people.

Motion:

The LG GX has a response time that is near-instant. In dark transitions, there is a little overshoot, which can lead to image distortion in dark scenes, but for the most part, motion appears very smooth.

There’s a slight dip in brightness every 8 ms, which coincides with the 120Hz refresh rate and isn’t noticeable.

To reduce screen tearing, the LG GX supports variable refresh rate technologies. We removed the FreeSync setting and allowed the G-SYNC setting with the Xbox One S connected to the TV. The Xbox revealed that the VRR was still running, and we were able to check that the HDR Forum VRR supports the Series.

Sound Quality:

There is a strong frequency response in the LG GX. The bass has a punch to it, but for every rumble or thump it can’t get deep enough. It gets noisy and has a well-balanced sound profile, so it sounds clear to the dialogue.

Decent performance of distortion. At modest listening levels, there’s not any distortion. At full volume, it rises, but most people do not hear this.

Smart features:

The built-in WebOS interface is easy-to-use and it’s fairly smooth to navigate. Unfortunately, there are ads on the home screen and app store, and there’s no way to disable them.

Final Thought:

The LG GX OLED is an outstanding all-around TV. Thanks to its almost infinite contrast ratio and perfect black uniformity, it’s a great alternative for watching movies in a dark space. The 120Hz refresh rate, VRR support, almost immediate response time, and low input lag should be enjoyed by gamers. If you want to watch the big game in a large seating configuration, it also has broad viewing angles. Unfortunately, it has the possibility of permanent burn-in, but regardless of the static aspects of most user interfaces, it is not suitable to use as a PC monitor.